Does LASIK Eye Surgery Hurt?

Does LASIK Eye Surgery Hurt?

Does LASIK Eye Surgery Hurt?” is one of the most curious questions of those who think of LASIK surgery. You can read the answer to this question in detail in this article. You can write comments for other questions you are curious about.

LASIK eye surgery is a surgery performed while you’re awake, similar to a cavity filling. One of the most common questions people ask is, “How does LASIK eye surgery feel?” The short answer is “A little awkward, but otherwise not like much.”

First steps of LASIK eye surgery

During the first step of LASIK — the creation of the protective corneal flap with a laser or an instrument called a microkeratome — you will likely feel some pressure on your eye. But typically this is not painful, and the sensation lasts less than a minute.

When you return home from your LASIK surgery and the anesthesia (numbing) eye drops wear off, it’s common to experience sensitivity to light, watery eyes, and mild to moderate eye discomfort for a few hours. Generally, if this is bothersome, over-the-counter pain medications will ease the discomfort.

Holding your eye open

Once you lie down in the laser suite, the numbing eye drops will have taken effect, though your doctor may administer more. Your eyelids aren’t numb, so you may feel your doctor use an instrument to hold your eye open. This instrument looks like a speculum and can take a minute or so to adjust to. If you hold your eye open with two clean fingers, as if you’re putting in a contact lens, you can feel how your eyes adjust to reduced blinking. This is similar to how you’ll feel during LASIK eye surgery.

How does LASIK eye surgery feel afterward?

If you experience significant eye pain after LASIK surgery — especially if over-the-counter pain medicine is ineffective at managing it — call your LASIK surgeon for advice.

Some LASIK surgeons may routinely give their patients a prescription for pain medicine when they leave the laser center in case they need it later to manage short-term eye discomfort after surgery. But most patients find that if they experience eye discomfort after LASIK, it usually is relatively mild and resolves within several hours without medication.

LASIK Eye Surgery Cost

LASIK EYE SURGERY COST

By reading this article, you may have information about the LASIK Eye Surgery Cost. The most curious question about Laser Eye Surgery: How much is LASIK?

The best answer is this: There is no single answer. The cost of LASIK varies widely from the “too good to be true” $299 per eye on TV commercials to the equally incredible $5,000 per eye. The national average cost of Custom Bladeless LASIK (the type doctors and patients prefer for its advanced safety) is about $2,000 per eye, and a little more than that in larger cities with a higher cost of living..

Average LASIK Eye Surgery Costs

Keep in mind that these prices are for LASIK or other laser vision correction performed on one eye only. To estimate your cost of LASIK on both eyes, you need to double the price quoted.

Also, if you choose bladeless LASIK, where the corneal flap is created with a femtosecond laser instead of a microkeratome, expect to pay at least a couple hundred dollars more (per eye) than the average prices quoted here. The same is true if you choose custom LASIK that employs wavefront technology for the most precise vision correction possible.

In 2015, the average price for LASIK and other types of laser vision correction surgery was $2,077 per eye. This is slightly lower than the average price in 2014, which was $2,118 per eye.

Pricing Methods

More than 3 out of 4 refractive surgeons (78 percent) said they quote a single price for LASIK and other excimer laser-based procedures for all patients, according to a 2015 survey.

The other surgeons (22 percent) quote different prices depending on the technology used and/or the amount of refractive error and vision correction required by the patient.

Charging a single price means newer technologies such as customized wavefront procedures and laser-created flaps are not priced separately as “extras” that are charged in addition to a basic fee for a laser vision correction procedure.

Are Bargain Prices Available For LASIK?

It’s not unusual to see advertisements promising LASIK for less than $1,000 per eye, which may sound like a great bargain.

But it’s likely that:

The “bargain” LASIK price is only for the correction of mild nearsightedness. If you have farsightedness, astigmatism, or moderate to high amounts of nearsightedness, the cost of LASIK may be significantly higher than the advertised price.
The offer price doesn’t cover all fees. For instance, you may have only a limited number of follow-up visits, and if there’s a problem, additional post-op care could cost extra. Also, the cost of enhancement/retreatment surgeries probably are not included, and you may even be charged extra for your initial consultation.
Your procedure may be performed with older technology. This isn’t necessarily bad, but newer technologies do offer the possibility of a more precise LASIK procedure, with less risk of complications. For example, for $499 you likely won’t receive custom LASIK or bladeless (all-laser) LASIK.
If you’re considering LASIK for an unusually low cost, make sure you get a written quote that itemizes everything in the offer. Read the fine print, and ask about all potential extra fees before going ahead with the procedure.

How To Make LASIK Surgery More Affordable

There are a number of ways to make the cost of LASIK more affordable.

Many eye care practices offer financing for LASIK and other vision surgeries. Several financing companies specialize in elective surgical procedures like LASIK and offer plans with fixed rates and long-term payments. Most LASIK surgery centers and private medical practices offer financing plans administered by these companies to their patients.

Most vision insurance plans don’t cover refractive surgery because they consider it cosmetic and therefore medically unnecessary. However, some employers make arrangements with a given LASIK center (or refractive surgery center) for a special price.

Note that some large employers offer subsidized health plans that cover at least part of LASIK costs. If you work for a major company, ask about possible benefits that might cover elective corrective eye surgery procedures.

Also, Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) are often used to pay for laser eye surgery. This is where you can divert pre-tax salary into an account for out-of-pocket health care, if your employer offers it.

In 2016, the maximum employee contribution to an FSA was $2,550. So it’s likely you still will have to pay a portion of your LASIK surgery by other means if you use an FSA to help pay for your procedure.

Another option is to set tax-free money aside in a Health Savings Account (HSA) to pay for LASIK surgery. To be eligible for an HSA, you must be covered by a high-deductible health plan (HDHP) at work.

You can add tax-free contributions to your HSA each pay period, up to an annual limit of $3,350 for individual coverage and $6,750 for family coverage (2016 limits). And, unlike an FSA, any unspent money in your HSA at the end of the year “rolls over” so you can use it the following year or sometime further in the future.

So, depending on your budget, you could save enough money to pay the entire cost of your LASIK surgery by contributing money to your HSA over a period of two or more years.

If you’re in the U.S. military, LASIK and other corrective vision surgery options may be available to you free of charge. Your eligibility would depend at least partly on the nature of your duties.

A final note: You may be tempted to choose a surgeon based only on the fee charged, but that may be unwise. It’s better to choose the best surgeon you can find and then, if you need it, get the most affordable financing you can.

Lasik Eye Surgery Problems

The Diabetic Eye

Lasik Complications

You may read all Lasik Eye Surgery Problems like dry eyes, halos and slipped flap in this post. You can leave a comment for this post and you can share your LASIK story if you experienced it.

Vision loss due to infection

Vision Loss Due To Infection
Vision Loss Due To Infection

On October 10, 2006, WebMD reported on a peer-reviewed study in the Archives of Ophthalmology in which statistical analysis revealed that vision loss risk as a result of an infection for contact lens wearers is higher than vision loss risk as a result of an infection from LASIK.

 

Daily contact lens wearers have a 1-in-2,000 chance of significant vision loss. The researchers calculated the risk of significant vision loss consequence of LASIK surgery to be closer to 1-in-10,000 cases.

Higher-order aberrations

Higher-order aberrations
Higher-order aberrations

The term “higher-order aberrations” are visual problems that require special testing for diagnosis and are not corrected with normal spectacles (eyeglasses). These aberrations include ‘starbursts’, ‘ghosting’, ‘halos’ and others. Some patients describe these symptoms post-operatively and associate them with the LASIK technique including the formation of the flap and the tissue ablation. The advancement of the LASIK technology has reduced the risk of clinically significant visual impairment after surgery. There is a correlation between pupil size and aberrations. This correlation may be the result of irregularity in the corneal tissue between the untouched part of the cornea and the reshaped part. Daytime post-LASIK vision is optimal, since the pupil size is smaller than the LASIK flap. However, at night, the pupil may dilate such that light passes through the edge of the LASIK flap which gives rise to aberrations. LASIK and PRK may induce spherical aberration if the laser under corrects as it moves outward from the centre of the treatment zone, especially when major corrections are made. Others propose that higher order aberrations are present preoperatively. They can be measured in micrometers (µm) whereas the smallest laser beam size approved by the FDA is about 1000 times larger, at 0.65 mm. In situ keratomileusis effected at a later age increases the incidence of corneal higher-order wavefront aberrations. These factors demonstrate the importance of careful patient selection for LASIK treatment.

Dry eyes

Dry Eyes
Dry Eyes

Some people experience dry eyes following surgery. Although it is usually temporary it can develop into dry eye syndrome. Underlying conditions with dry eye such as Sjögren’s syndrome are considered contraindications to Lasik. Treatments include artificial tears, prescription tears and punctal occlusion. Punctal occlusion is accomplished by placing a collagen or silicone plug in the tear duct, which normally drains fluid from the eye. Some patients complain of ongoing dry eye symptoms despite such treatments and dry eye symptoms may be permanent.

Halos

Halos
Halos

Some post-LASIK patients see halos and starbursts around bright lights at night. At night, the pupil may dilate to be larger than the flap leading to the edge of the flap or stromal changes causing visual distortion of light that does not occur during the day when the pupil is smaller. The eyes can be examined for large pupils pre-operatively and the risk of this symptom assessed.

Complications due to LASIK have been classified as those that occur due to preoperative, intraoperative, early postoperative, or late postoperative sources: According to the UK National Health Service complications occur in fewer than 5% of cases.

Other complications

  • Flap Complications – The incidence of flap complications is about 0.244%. Flap complications (such as displaced flaps or folds in the flaps that necessitate repositioning, diffuse lamellar keratitis, and epithelial ingrowth) are common in lamellar corneal surgeries but rarely lead to permanent loss of visual acuity. The incidence of these microkeratome-related complications decreases with increased physician experience.
  • Slipped Flap – is a corneal flap that detaches from the rest of the cornea. The chances of this are greatest immediately after surgery, so patients typically are advised to go home and sleep to let the flap adhere and heal. Patients are usually given sleep goggles or eye shields to wear for several nights to prevent them from dislodging the flap in their sleep. A short operation time may decrease the chance of this complication, as there is less time for the flap to dry.
  • Flap interface particles – are a finding whose clinical significance is undetermined. Particles of various sizes and reflectivity are clinically visible in about 38.7% of eyes examined via slit lamp biomicroscopy and in 100% of eyes examined by confocal microscopy.
  • Diffuse lamellar keratitis – an inflammatory process that involves an accumulation of white blood cells at the interface between the LASIK corneal flap and the underlying stroma. It is known colloquially as “sands of Sahara syndrome” because on slit lamp exam, the inflammatory infiltrate appears similar to waves of sand. The USAeyes organisation reports an incidence of 2.3% after LASIK. It is most commonly treated with steroid eye drops. Sometimes it is necessary for the eye surgeon to lift the flap and manually remove the accumulated cells. DLK has not been reported with photorefractive keratectomy due to the absence of flap creation.
  • Infection – the incidence of infection responsive to treatment has been estimated at 0.4%.
  • Post-LASIK corneal ectasia – a condition where the cornea starts to bulge forwards at a variable time after LASIK, causing irregular astigmatism. the condition is similar to keratoconus.
  • Subconjunctival Hemorrhage – A report shows the incidence of subconjunctival hemorrhage has been estimated at 10.5%.
  • Corneal Scarring – or permanent problems with cornea’s shape making it impossible to wear contact lenses.
  • Epithelial Ingrowth – estimated at 0.1%.
  • Traumatic Flap Dislocations – Cases of late traumatic flap dislocations have been reported up to seven years after LASIK.
  • Retinal Detachment: estimated at 0.36 percent.
  • Choroidal Neovascularization: estimated at 0.33 percent.
  • Uveitis: estimated at 0.18 percent.
  • For Climbers – Although the cornea usually is thinner after LASIK, because of the removal of part of the stroma, refractive surgeons strive to maintain the maximum thickness to avoid structurally weakening the cornea. Decreased atmospheric pressure at higher altitudes has not been demonstrated as extremely dangerous to the eyes of LASIK patients. However, some mountain climbers have experienced a myopic shift at extreme altitudes.
  • Late Postoperative Complications – A large body of evidence on the chances of long-term complications is not yet established and may be changing due to advances in operator experience, instruments and techniques.Potential best vision loss a year after the surgery regardless of use of glasses.

Alternatives for LASIK

Alternatives for LASIK

If you are not a good candidate for LASIK there are many other ways that can still correct your vision and give you freedom from the glasses or contact lenses. Such as PRK or intraocular contact lens or lens exchange. In PRK used exactly the same laser that used for LASIK but it doesn’t make a flap. So the healing pattern is very different from LASIK. In intraocular contact lens that keeps your natural lens in, and on top of that puts a second lens inside your eye so you are not dependent on putting contact lenses on top of your eye externally. In lens exchange it can remove your natural lens and replace it with a new intraocular lens and that can give you vision free of eyeglasses or contact lenses.The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration will consider applicants with PRK once they are fully healed and stabilized, provided there are no complications and all other visual standards are met. Pilots should be aware, however, that potential employers, such as commercial airlines and private companies, may have policies that consider refractive surgery a disqualifying condition. Also, civilians who wish to fly military aircraft should know that there are restrictions on those who have had corrective surgery. The Army now permits flight applicants who have undergone PRK or LASIK. Uncomplicated, successful corneal refractive surgery does not require a waiver and is noted as information only. 

Please don’t forget, eye surgeries which used laser are have some risks.

5 Foods for Healthy Eyes

Carrots

Beyond carrots

Carrots
Carrots

You’ve probably heard that carrots and other orange-colored fruits and vegetables promote eye health and protect vision, and it’s true: Beta-carotene, a type of vitamin A that gives these foods their orange hue, helps the retina and other parts of the eye to function smoothly.

But eating your way to good eyesight isn’t only about beta-carotene. Though their connection to vision isn’t as well-known, several other vitamins and minerals are essential for healthy eyes. Make these five foods a staple of your diet to keep your peepers in tip-top shape.

Leafy greens

Leafy Greens
Leafy Greens

They’re packed with lutein and zeaxanthin—antioxidants that, studies show, lower the risk of developing macular degeneration and cataracts.

Eggs

Eggs
Eggs

The yolk is a prime source of lutein and zeaxanthin—plus zinc, which also helps reduce your macular degeneration risk, according to Paul Dougherty, MD, medical director of Dougherty Laser Vision in Los Angeles.

Citrus and berries

Berries
Berries

These fruits are powerhouses of vitamin C, which has been shown to reduce the risk of developing macular degeneration and cataracts.

Almonds

Almonds
Almonds

They’re filled with vitamin E, which slows macular degeneration, research shows. One handful (an ounce) provides about half of your daily dose of E.

Fatty fish

Tuna, salmon, mackerel, anchovies and trout are rich in DHA, a fatty acid found in your retina—low levels of which have been linked to dry eye syndrome, says Jimmy Lee, MD, director of refractive surgery at Montefiore Medical Center, in New York City.

Eye Benefits of Vitamins and Micronutrients

The following vitamins, minerals and other nutrients have been shown to be essential for good vision and may protect your eyes from sight-robbing conditions and diseases.

Incorporating the following foods in your diet will help you get the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of these important eye nutrients. Established by the Institute of Medicine (National Academy of Sciences), the RDA is the average daily dietary intake level of a nutrient sufficient to meet the requirements of nearly all healthy individuals in a specific life stage and gender group.

While the RDA is a useful reference, some eye care practitionersrecommend higher daily intakes of certain nutrients for people at risk for eye problems.

(In the following list, mg = milligram; mcg = microgram (1/1000 of a mg) and IU = International Unit.)

Beta-carotene

Eye benefits of beta-carotene: When taken in combination with zinc and vitamins C and E, beta-carotene may reduce the progression of macular degeneration.
Food sources: Carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, kale, butternut squash.
RDA: None (most supplements contain 5,000 to 25,000 IU).

Bioflavonoids (Flavonoids)

Eye benefits of bioflavonoids: May protect against cataracts and macular degeneration.
Food sources: Tea, red wine, citrus fruits, bilberries, blueberries, cherries, legumes, soy products.
RDA: None.

Lutein and Zeaxanthin

Eye benefits of lutein and zeaxanthin: May prevent cataracts and macular degeneration.
Food sources: Spinach, kale, turnip greens, collard greens, squash.
RDA: None.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Eye benefits of omega-3 fatty acids: May help prevent macular degeneration (AMD) and dry eyes.
Food sources: Cold-water fish such as salmon, mackerel and herring; fish oil supplements, freshly ground flaxseeds, walnuts.
RDA: None; but for cardiovascular benefits, the American Heart Association recommends approximately 1,000 mg daily.

Selenium

Eye benefits of selenium: When combined with carotenoids and vitamins C and E, may reduce risk of advanced AMD.
Food sources: Seafood (shrimp, crab, salmon, halibut), Brazil nuts, enriched noodles, brown rice.
RDA: 55 mcg for teens and adults (60 mcg for women during pregnancy and 70 mcg when breast-feeding).

Vitamin A

Eye benefits of vitamin A: May protect against night blindness and dry eyes.
Food sources: Beef or chicken liver; eggs, butter, milk.
RDA: 3,000 IU for men; 2,333 IU for women (2,567 IU during pregnancy and 4,333 IU when breast-feeding).

Vitamin C

Eye benefits of vitamin C: May reduce the risk of cataracts and macular degeneration.
Food sources: Sweet peppers (red or green), kale, strawberries, broccoli, oranges, cantaloupe.
RDA: 90 mg for men; 70 mg for women (85 mg during pregnancy and 120 mg when breast-feeding).

Vitamin D

Eye benefits of vitamin D: May reduce the risk of macular degeneration.
Food sources: Salmon, sardines, mackerel, milk; orange juice fortified with vitamin D.
RDA: None, but the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends 400 IU per day for infants, children and adolescents, and many experts recommend higher daily intakes for adults.
The best source of vitamin D is exposure to sunlight. Ultraviolet radiation from the sun stimulates production of vitamin D in human skin, and just a few minutes of exposure to sunlight each day (without sunscreen) will insure your body is producing adequate amounts of vitamin D.

Vitamin E

Eye benefits of vitamin E: When combined with carotenoids and vitamin C, may reduce the risk of advanced AMD.
Food sources: Almonds, sunflower seeds, hazelnuts.
RDA: 15 mg for teens and adults (15 mg for women during pregnancy and 19 mg when breast-feeding).

Zinc

Eye benefits of zinc: Helps vitamin A reduce the risk of night blindness; may play a role in reducing risk of advanced AMD.
Food sources: Oysters, beef, Dungeness crab, turkey (dark meat).
RDA: 11 mg for men; 8 mg for women (11 mg during pregnancy and 12 mg when breast-feeding).
In general, it’s best to obtain most nutrients through a healthy diet, including at least two servings of fish per week and plenty of colorful fruits and vegetables.

If you plan to begin a regimen of eye vitamins, be sure to discuss this with your optometrist or ophthalmologist. Taking too much of certain vision supplements can cause problems, especially if you are taking prescription medications for health problems.

Top 8 Tips to Care for Your Eyeglasses

Tips to care for your eyeglasses

You invest a lot of time in finding the right pair of eyeglasses. You look for the right frame shape, in a pattern or color that perfectly expresses you. You patiently wait for the lenses to be fitted and for that call telling you that your new eyeglasses are ready for pick up.Don’t you want to do everything you can to make these glasses last as long as possible?

Tips To Maintain Eyeglasses

Here are some great tips on how to take proper care of your eyeglasses that will help make them last:

Rinse

Always rinse your glasses off with water before wiping or cleaning them. Even tiny particles of dust or dirt can settle on your lens, and if you wipe those around on a dry lens, it can be abrasive.

Spray Carefully

If you’re going to use a chemical, use sprays or cleansers that are specifically made to clean eyeglass lenses. Never use household cleaners like Windex, because these chemicals contain ammonia, which will actually tear off the any coating that is on the lens.

Air Dry

If you can, allow your glasses to air dry. This is another great way to keep any materials from getting on to your lens. If you can’t set them down to air dry, wipe them down with a soft, clean, lint-free cloth.

Use the Right Cloth

NEVER use paper towels, tissue, or napkins to dry your lenses. All of these materials, regardless of how soft they are on your skin, have a textured surface and can easily scratch your lenses.

Also, refrain from using the tail of your shirt. If the clothing is not 100% cotton, the fibers in the fabric will scratch the lens of your eyeglasses over time. The clothing can also have dirt on it, which means the residue ends up transferred to your lenses.

Grip Firmly

Hold your frames by gripping the piece that crosses the bridge of the nose. This will keep you from accidently bending the frame while you clean. Bent glasses can negatively affect the way you see out of your glasses. Plus, if your frames are bent out of shape, they’re more likely to feel uncomfortable.

Store Properly

Store your glasses when you’re not wearing them. This isn’t just a great way to keep dust and dirt away from your eyeglasses, but it also protects your specs from getting scratched, bent or broken.

If you don’t want a big, bulky case, sleeker ones are available. Microfiber pouches are also great to keep at your office desk or on your night stand for glasses you don’t necessarily wear all the time, like reading glasses.

Place Carefully

Don’t lay your glasses lens down. This is just asking for scratched lenses.

Wash Often

Washing your glasses at least once a day will keep your lenses in their optimal state. The cleaner your glasses, the less your eyes have to strain to see through smudges, dirt and dust.

Follow these great tips, and we are sure you’ll never want to leave your super clean specs behind.

Contact Lens Tips

Tips For Contact Lens Wearers

Many people new to contact lenses, and even some experienced wearers, have practical questions about contacts.

These tips can help you deal with everyday contact lens concerns.

Is My Contact Lens Inside Out?

A question many newbie wearers have is: “How can I tell if my contact lens is inside-out?”

The trick is to place the lens on your finger so that a cup is formed. Then hold the lens up directly in front of your eyes so you’re looking at the side of the cup.

If the lens forms a “U” with the top edges flared out, it’s inside out. If it forms just a “U,” it’s in the correct position.

If you’re wearing lenses with a handling tint, another way is to place the lens on your fingertip and then look down at it. The edge of a tinted lens should look very blue (or green, depending on the tint); that won’t be the case if the lens is inverted.

Some contact lenses also have a laser marking, such as the brand name, on the edge to help you. If you can read it properly, the lens is not inside out.

Don’t worry if you place a contact lens in your eye inside out. The lens will feel uncomfortable, but it can’t do any damage.

Applying Your Contact Lenses

Make sure you wash your hands thoroughly before applying your contact lenses, but avoid scented or oily soaps that might adhere to the lens surface. Especially avoid using products containing lanolin and moisturizing lotions.

Some eye doctors say to always apply the first contact lens in the same eye, so you’ll avoid the possibility of mixing up lenses for the right eye and left eye.

Other basic guidelines for contact lens application include:

  • Gently shake your lens case containing the storage solution, to loosen the contact lens should it be stuck. (Don’t try pulling at the lens with your finger, or you might damage it.)
  • Slide the lens out of its case and into the palm of your hand. Rinse thoroughly with the appropriate contact lens solution.
  • Place the contact lens on the tip of your index or middle finger, which should be dry or mostly dry.
  • With the fingers and thumb of your other hand, simultaneously pull up on your upper eyelid and down on your lower eyelid.
  • Position the lens on your eye while looking upward or forward, whichever you find to be easier. You also can apply the contact lens by placing it on the white of the eye closest to your ear.
  • Gently close your eye, roll your eyes in a complete circle to help the lens settle, and then blink.
  • Look closely in the mirror to make sure the lens is centered on your eye. If it is, the lens should be comfortable and your vision should be clear.

Removing Your Contact Lenses

Always wash your hands before removing contact lenses. If you are standing in front of a sink, use a clean paper towel to cover the drain where the contact lens might accidentally fall.

To remove soft contact lenses, look upward or sideways while you pull down on your lower eyelid. With a finger, gently maneuver the lens onto the white of your eye. There, you can very gently pinch the lens together with your index finger and thumb and lift it off the eye.

Until you master contact lens removal, you might want to keep your fingernails short to avoid accidentally scratching and damaging your eye.

Gas permeable contact lenses can be removed by holding out the palm of your hand, bending over, and then opening your eye wide. With one finger of your other hand, pull the skin between your upper and lower eyelid (just outside the lateral aspect of your eye) outward toward your ear with your eye wide open. Then blink. The contact lens should pop right out and into your open palm.

Devices for removing contact lenses, called “plungers,” also are available from your eye doctor, and can be used to touch and directly remove a lens from your eye. Just make sure you touch only the lens and not your eye’s surface with these devices.

While you might hear a myth or two about someone “losing” a contact lens in the back of the eye, this is actually impossible because of a membrane that connects your eye to the back of your eyelid.

Contact Lenses And UV Light

Researchers have linked ultraviolet (UV) light to the formation of cataracts. Exposure to excessive UV light also may result in a condition called photokeratitis.

That’s why some contact lenses now contain a UV-blocking agent. You can’t tell if a contact lens has a UV blocker just by looking at it — the blocking agent is clear, so as not to disturb vision. The contact lens packaging will specify if the product has a UV blocker, or you can ask your eye doctor.

Very important: UV-blocking contacts are not meant to replace sunglasses. A contact lens covers only your cornea, not your entire eye.

However, UV-blocking contact lenses do help protect the portion of the white of your eye that is covered from formation of growths such as pingueculae and pterygia.

Sunglasses with UV protection can cover more of your eye and the parts of your face that surround the eye, depending on the size of the sunglass lens. That’s why contacts with UV blockers are designed to complement sunglass use as an added protection.

Eye Makeup And Contact Lenses

Getting makeup in your eye is annoying. But it’s even worse with contacts, because it can stick to the lenses instead of flushing right out. Follow these tips to keep your eyes looking and feeling good:

  • Put your contact lenses on before applying makeup. And always wash your hands thoroughly before touching your contacts, so you won’t transfer any oils, creams or lotions to the lenses.
  • Use only non-allergenic makeup. Almay and Clinique have eye-friendly products, but there are other good brands as well.
  • Cream eye shadow is less likely to get in your eye than powder. But creams can irritate your eyes more if they do make it into your eyes. Choose water-based rather than oil-based creams.
  • If you prefer powder, keep your eyes closed during application. Then, brush off any excess powder before opening your eyes.
  • Never apply eyeliner between your lashes and your eye. Apply eyeliner only on the portion of your lashes that is well away from your eye.
  • To remove eye makeup, wash and dry your hands. Then remove your contacts, being careful not to bump them into any makeup. Finally, use your eye makeup remover.
  • Replace your eye makeup frequently — at least every three months. Don’t use old eye makeup, because over time bacteria will get into the product and then into your eyes, where it can cause an infection. One way to tell if your makeup is too old is if it smells funny. Also, don’t share your eye makeup with others.